makeshift

makeshift

What holds grief? What furrow deep inside, what red canal, hoards the debris, the leavings, the cut-away parts of my original form? Is there enough left? Can my true form be recovered?
Once upon a time I was a boy, not especially happy, destined for ordinary incompleteness, and the daubed, crudely-molded, and spruced character with which we makeshift, once conflagrations are doused and youth's megrims give way.
Three boys took my cocked hat, my hope for a natural death, my healthy color in good company. They corrupted me. They made me think they knew me, better than anyone, before or since.  They removed the boy I was and crawled in, to fester in the raw empty, and became ghouls in my oily corners, squatting on crumbled concrete. Thieves. Monsters.

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PSA for MovDis

PSA for MovDis

A Public Service Announcement for people who like people with movement disorders.

—We become more symptomatic as the day/evening wears on, or with stress, or heat, or just 'cause. We're not getting "worse" or "better" "these days."

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Interview: Massimo Pigliucci


I went to hear Massimo Pigliucci at SUNY Ulster on May 5th (2012. He was promoting his book, "Nonsense on Stilts: How to Tell Science from Bunk." It's full of lucid examples from the borderlands of science and pseudo-science, and a lot of fun to read. The talk included a funny and useful slideshow. He presented some remarkable (and challenging) points about the methods we use to determine the validity of what we read and hear.

Afterwards, I was able to tag along for drinks with Massimo and three teachers, and we had a jolly time until 10 pm, when the bar cranked up the Stones (for Cinco de Mayo), and I fled the noise.

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What Kindle Can't Do

A_History_of_the_Printed_Book

In 1936, the publishers of The Dolphin: A Journal of the Making of Books, began work on “A History of the Printed Book.”

They commissioned essays. They sent staff into the cauldron of pre-war Europe to rescue woodblocks, copperplates, etchings, and examples. They were convinced that books would always exist, and felt an obligation to document the original materials and methods, and the talented artisans, who invented and perfected printing.

The result is a richly illustrated and uniquely detailed history, written by scholars.

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fine art prints
writing by Greg Correll